Health News, Obstetrics & Gynecology

Vaginal Birth After Cesarean health risks too great

Washington, DC -- Women and birth centers are strongly advised against attempting VBACs (vaginal birth after cesarean) in birth centers because the health risks are too great, according to the results of a new national study published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology. While researchers found that women attempting VBAC in a birth center who were at least 42 weeks of gestation or who have had more than one previous cesarean delivery had the worst outcomes, they advise all women against attempting a VBAC anywhere but in a hospital.

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Routine Episiotomy Use in Uncomplicated Births Offers No Benefits to Women

Routine use of episiotomy for uncomplicated vaginal births does not provide immediate or longer term benefits for the mother, according to a review of scientific evidence sponsored by Health and Human Service's Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). (Episiotomy is the surgical cutting of the perineum?the skin between the vaginal opening and the anus?and is a common procedure used in an estimated one-third of vaginal deliveries to hasten birth or prevent tearing of the skin during delivery.) The findings are published in this week's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Read more: Routine Episiotomy Use in Uncomplicated Births Offers No Benefits to Women